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Grey Matters Blog celebrates senior dogs and provides a resource for the people who care for them. It draws upon the wealth of knowledge and experience with senior dogs offered by The Grey Muzzle Organization community. Our contributors will share articles on senior dog care, as well as relevant news, success stories from our grantee organizations, and more. 

The Dogs of Olde: Notable Dogs in History by Katie Kapro

Most of us, whether we’ll admit it in a public forum or not, think our dogs deserve to be famous—either for their weirdness, their cute expressions, their loyalty, or their funny habits. (Thus, internet sensations like the aww subreddit). Add that to the fact that their quirks only increase with age and become more endearing to our oh-so susceptible hearts, and we’re putty in their paws. They are celebrities in our eyes. In honor of our unsung heroes—the ones staring over your laptop right now or barking at the meerkats on TV—let us celebrate some of the qualities that have catapulted other...

The key to maintaining your dog’s healthy joints: A holistic mindset! by Dr. James St. Clair

In my first two blog post here on the Grey Matters Blog we discussed simple signs for you to look for to potentially identify if your dog has joint pain or not. We then introduced the concept of “The Pain Trial,” which all dog owners should know about and be able to discuss with their veterinarian. I have listed these posts for easy reference, in case you missed them.

The Pain Trial Concept for Dogs: What is it and why is it important? by Dr. James St. Clair

In my last post here on the Grey Matters Blog, I described the “Silent Signs” dogs show us that they are potentially dealing with chronic pain specifically related to their joints or spine. We discussed that it is critical for us, as pet parents, to change our perception of pain when it comes to our dogs and actually LEARN HOW TO LISTEN to them differently than we do now. The truth is that most dogs don’t cry, whine, or whimper when dealing with chronic pain.

Is my dog in pain? What to look for and how to listen by Dr. James St. Clair

As pet parents we’ve all most likely been in situations where our dogs have gotten hurt. Whether you accidentally tripped over your dog or stepped on their paw carelessly, you’ve probably heard your dog let out a quick yelp or cry and run off. Was it pain or fear? Either way how did you feel in that moment? Does the word horrible come to mind!

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